Monday, January 31, 2011

Serve With Love

Tonight a sacred ritual was performed..A ritual that is performed in every Church in every land and is understood in every culture. It falls into "mourning with those who mourn..comforting those who stand in need of comforting". I'm sure it was done in prehistoric ages..I'm sure a Woolly Mammoth was slaughtered and brought to the tribe. It's what we do when we can't do anything else. We feed the masses. We bring our casseroles, our bread, our meat, our sweets, our jello. We bring our love for the ones suffering the loss of their loved one. Not knowing what to say, perhaps not being able to help in any other way, food can be the universal point of understanding. It gives a grieving family time to sit and talk to each other, reminisce, and remember with love one who's not there to join in. The food arrived in containers, crock pots, foil pans..a seemingly endless trail of sustenance. Enough to feed, and more to take home for later. The fishes and the loaves..We worried at first if there would be enough. Then we worried about where to put it all. My Mother was/is the greatest testament to that parable. No one ever left our home hungry. My Greek Mom knows how to extend a few cookies, crackers and tuna into a feast. Her magic wand? A wooden spoon. Her magic words: Just Do It..(Nike stole it from her). She passed it on to her children and I've used it as often as the occasion arose. Maybe not quite to Mom's height of serving..she is the Master after all..the Yoda of Church funeral dinners. But I think even she would have been proud of us today. I'm proud of the women I serve with in our Church...our tiny branch here in Ashland. What we lack in numbers, we make up in casserole dishes! But tonight one of them is going home to a house without her loving husband. Tonight she was in need of comfort. In need of help. In need of friends who didn't hesitate to give, to serve and will be there whenever she needs us.

15 comments:

B. WHITTINGTON said...

The older I get the more I think about losing my spouse and while we are Christians and know where we are going after death it causes us to shudder when we think of our deaths. What it does to the children and grandchildren. Yes, we feed people. Always. Our family usually has a family reunion when someone passes away because we don't often see aunts, uncles, cousins unless there is a death.
You've given me some food for thought this evening. Blessings to the dear lady who lost her husband.
Barb

Rose said...

very good post. i can't remember as a child in Penn. that families had visitors bring food and comfort when someone died. i see this alot in Ga. and feel it's a good way to show concern, respect to a family of a deceased person. when my 1st husband was killed i had an outpour of church people bring food items to my home. a good feeling at a bad time. rose

Catch the Kids said...

This is a wonderful post. Food is a symbol in so many ways. As you say, sometimes it's the only thing we can do. When my daughter was so sick, many people bought food regularly for a whole year! I will always be grateful for their love and care. My sympathies to the lady who lost her husband.

acorn hollow said...

food is always used to comfort. When we can't think of anything else to do we cook. what a wonderful church to come together to make this time easier.
for a family or friend.
Cathy

Deb Shucka said...

What a beautifully written piece. Powerful and poignant, and perfectly crafted.

Karen Whittal said...

I think that just knowing that someone cares is all that people need, what a blessing you must all have been

Sue said...

This is just beautiful, and I agree that the feeding we do at funerals is definitely soul food.

You have really touched me this morning. Thank you.

=)

Stacy Crawford said...

Thanks for being there Kathy! It sure made it easier for me to go to my conference knowing that you'd be there.

I'm glad the sisters came through. I know Dee is so amazed at the love our little branch showed her and her family. Humbled even.

I agree food is the thing that we all know how to do when we don't know what else to do.

karen said...

That was a beautiful post. You really hit at the core of our traditions of mourning. Isn't it beautiful how people come together in times of need? Thank you for this message - it was heartwarming.

rosaria said...

We come together in times of sorrow, in time of joy. Lucky are those who have a community of caring souls around them.

Steve and Hailey said...

Oh that is so sweet. I think I've had a few experiences when I've felt how much I need other women and the Relief Society specifically. Food is the most basic thing to give, but at times it's just what makes or breaks a situation.

Did you guys get hit with the storm? I love the picture at the top of your blog.

Nezzy said...

Bereavement dinners can be a wonderful blessin' to the family and a glorious ministry to those who serve. I jump in every time I can at these functions. I've been on the other end and know how much it helps the family.

Your giving heart is shining through this post sweetie!!!

God bless ya and have a warm fuzzy kinda day! :o)

CHERI said...

I am so sorry for the loss of this husband. I'm Baptist and we definitely believe in carrying in the casseroles and comfort foods when there is a death or illness. I've just gotten home after surgery and have already received chicken & dumplings, soups, and pound cake...and a meal is coming tomorrow evening. Friends are so dear to help us out in times of need.

Donna said...

Don't know how I missed this post...but talking about this at work reminds me of how amazing it is that things "just work out" sometimes! Not thinking you had enough food and then having much leftover is a God gift, I think. You are so much like your mother (and sister)who is just phenomenol in the kitchen.
That is such a comfort and gift in itself to those around you!!!

Rose said...

thanks for the great comment on my post yes, grandchildren are fantastic.i love to buy girly clothes for my lttle one take care rose